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20130421
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analyst jim walsh joins me here in a very chilly boston at this hour. gentlemen, we've been talking about this, you know, off and on this evening about the fbi. whether they dropped the ball. and a lot of monday morning quarterbacking going on. lou, to you in new york. it's too soon to tell, but there was certainly -- the fbi will certainly have to answer some questions after the older brother took a trip to russia and no one really followed up on that, lou. >> yes, i agree with you, don. i think there are some questions that need to be answered in the proper forum. i do think director muller and administrators of the fbi that had knowledge of the heads up they received from the russian government, sfb, their intelligence group, they'll have to explain exactly what transpired here and answer as to why they did or didn't do things. >> jim, it is bloelieved, everye has said they believe the brothers acted alone. is it too soon to tell? considering as much firepower they had and how some people thought they planned this out. >> yes. >> could there be someone else out there? >> i'm glad you a
analyst mr. jim walsh. he joins me here in boston. >> cold boston. >> everyone is asking me, is it that cold in boston? it is. >> you're clearly not a native new englander. you picked a bad spot. >> we're in a wind tunnel. i'll ask you since we are here talking. did the fbi drop the ball in interviewing the older tsarnaev brother? >> i mean at a very simple level, based just on the outcome you would have to say yes. he interviewed him and he went on to commit an act. but i don't think we have the full answer here yet. what was the process that they followed? the fbi interviews a ton of folks every year. only a fraction of which are actually dangerous. they interview me when i go to aroon and north korea and come back. but obviously either they -- he fell through the cracks or at the time that they were interviewing him they weren't giving him anything actionable to continue his case. >> but, lou, he did visit russia, stayed there for six months. you feel the fbi dropped the ball? >> i'm not going to rush to judgment on this. i think we're going to have hearings where directo
torrential rains hit the area. a swollen river is forcing evacuations and road closures in some areas. jim spellman is live in peoria, illino illinois. it looks bad where you are. that water seems pretty high. >> about 14 feet above where it normally is right now, fredricka. this is the illinois river. it goes right through the heart of peoria, illinois. this building, the historic river station trying to keep dry. they're pumping out rooms in there. you can see people here are doing everything they can to try to prepare for another two feet or so of water. here in downtown peoria along the waterfront, they have erected this sort of handmade levy. sand bags over walls. they predict the water is going to get to just about here. if their predictions are right, they're hoping most of the businesses here are going to be okay. if their predictions are off, if any more rain comes or is higher than they predict, it will be trouble for the businesses. we were up in neighboring peoria heights, illinois. several businesses under water there. with 2 more feet to go in that part of illinois, there's g
completely agree. one of the close i found i especially really like was from a former congressman jim kline and he said it's a little hard to believe that your nonfiction book you can't put down. and i thought that it was especially appropriate because if you like this book, it's different from a lot of nonfiction work that i've read. and that it really does read like a thriller. it really does, it takes these little discussions, and jack should manatee, humanity side to it. >> guest: we like to think it's an important book in the sense that it tells you how the court works. there are so few good books out there that explains what's the process, how do they go about this, how do they decide these cases, what are they saying to one another? we see these cases that split the court five before. what do they think? to the personal this get into it? so it's about not just about capital punishment. it's a book about how the court operates. >> guest: when he did get into those in the library of congress, the memorandum, the notes back and forth between the justices that are available him and a lot
the period of jim crow. that is our live coverage for today and we hope your life again tomorrow. right now we are going to go to the hancock foundation building and this is where the history panel here at "the los angeles times" festival of books is just beginning. you are watching booktv on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] >> will you let me know when we are supposed to start? [laughter] >> good morning. that is my signal. my name is tim newton on back of "the los angeles times" and i'm pleased to welcome you to the 2013 festival of books. books. more specifically i'm delighted to welcome this morning to today's panel which brings some really remarkable authors to talk about their latest work and the idea behind him. before we get going i have been handed a piece of paper that says it's critically important that i read this. please silence all cell phones and i also need to tell you there is a book signing following the session here the book signing for this panel is in the staging area number one. i am told this is on the festival map and the center of the event program so the office h
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5